Tag Archives: The Adventures of Philip Marlowe

If you can’t beat him: Old-time radio listening, 21 June

Town Hall Tonight with Fred Allen: Crisis on the Showboat (NBC, 1939)

Fred Allen's Town Hall Tonight, as Al Hirschfeld sketched it, in a cartoon used for the cover of the republished Treadmill to Oblivion.

Fred Allen’s Town Hall Tonight, as Al Hirschfeld sketched it, in a cartoon used for the cover of the republished Treadmill to Oblivion.

The last-surviving installment of Fred Allen’s seminal Town Hall Tonight will just so happen to be the next-to-last show of the 1938-39 radio season. And a good thing, sort of, because Allen is about to be divested of the title that has enabled him to a comfortable presentation of his realistic hybrid between the better of vintage vaudeville and his own forward-looking satire.

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The end of an era for Jack Benny: Old-time radio listening, 26 December

The Jack Benny Program: The Last Show for NBC (NBC, 1949)

An NBC fixture since 1932, Jack Benny says goodbye to his longtime radio home following the network’s hubris—and personal humiliation—negotiating a new deal with its most popular comedian . . . (Photo: NBC)

Jack Benny says farewell to the network that’s been his radio home since 1932, preparing to move in a week to CBS. What’s the big deal, considering how frequently shows changed networks—usually, when they changed sponsors—prior to tonight? Easy: NBC has been Benny’s radio home since 1932, and his loyalty inside the industry is the proverbial stuff of legend.

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Baloney proof? Old-time radio listening, 26 September

The Adventures of Philip Marlowe: The Red Wind (Second series premiere; CBS, 1948)

Raymond Chandler preferred Gerald Mohr’s Marlowe, more or less . . . (Photo: CBS)

Raymond Chandler quaked when his classic hard-boiled detective moved to radio. Willing though he was to pose with Marlowe’s first on-air portrayer, Van Heflin, he was also known to have written fellow crime novelist Erle Stanley Gardner complaining that radio’s first stab at The Adventures of Philip Marlowe “was thoroughly flat.”

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