Tag Archives: William L. Shirer

8 December: Immediate aftermath

FDR before Congress, the day after . . . (Photo: National Archives.)

FDR before Congress (and a small crowd of radio microphones), the day after . . . (Photo: National Archives.)

PEARL HARBOUR: THE IMMEDIATE RESPONSES

Many Americans have hoped to avoid it, and enough Americans were said to embrace the prospect, but now the United States begins rounding into shape enough to respond to the Pearl Harbour attacks, the reality of the Axis, and the arduous path of international war.

Again, we seek not to judge retroactively but merely to listen and analyse in the context of its own time and place.

 

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8 December: In the immediate wake of Pearl Harbour . . .

Many hoped to avoid it. Enough were said to embrace the prospect. Now the United States and the world begins rounding into shape enough to respond to the Pearl Harbour attacks, the reality of the Axis, and the arduous path of international war.

 

PEARL HARBOUR: THE IMMEDIATE RESPONSES

President Franklin D. Roosevelt: “Yesterday . .. December 7, 1941 . . .” (CBS)

Eric Sevareid would be one of the CBS analysts covering FDR's "Infamy" address and call for declaration of war. (Photo: CBS.)

Eric Sevareid would be one of the CBS analysts covering FDR’s “Infamy” address and call for declaration of war. (Photo: CBS.)

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Hard-boiled laughs: Old-time radio listening, 20 September

Richard Diamond, Private Detective: The Bald Head Case (NBC, 1950)

Powell (right, with Ed Begley) as Richard Diamond—finally cracking his tough-guy/song-and-dance personae . . .

Dick Powell wanted to break both his tough-guy and his song-and-dance film images, so he took on Rogue’s Gallery, which turned out to be an underrated pilot fish (he left the show after three years; it endured for a few more without him) for his real radio starmaker, the breezier, livelier, funnier, and no less realistic Richard Diamond, Private Detective . . . and did precisely what he wanted.

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